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France has urged world and regional powers not to ignore the conflict that has already seen more than 400,000 people driven from their homes by acts of violence such as murder and rape. However, Paris is reluctant to be left to deal with another African hotspot after it felt allies such as the United States were hesitant to help it halt a rebel advance by al Qaeda-linked insurgents in Mali earlier this year. The African Union has deployed about 2,500 troops. But its resources are limited, prompting Paris to seek a U.N. Security Council mandate that would turn the operation into a U.N. peacekeeping force ultimately supported by French troops. “We will increase our support, especially in the logistics domain, after United Nations resolutions (are approved). We will also increase troops, a little at first. This will be done before the end of the year,” Fabius said. Fabius said the resolution was expected around December. SECURITY WOES France currently has about 400 troops in Bangui, protecting the airport and French interests. Fabius did not say how many troops will be added, but sources have told Reuters the numbers could be increased to about 700-750. Fabius said the dissolution of Seleka, a grouping of five northern rebel movements, must be real and concrete.

Sign up now! France vs. Finland, 2014 World Cup qualifying: Preview and TV schedule Gear Up! Jack Sargeant, SBNation Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 3:00 AM Didier Deschamps’ team host Finland in Paris on Tuesday, with the visitors currently sitting a position and five points below Les Bleus. France should take advantage of their superiority and record a win, though are unlikely to overtake group leaders Spain and qualify for Brazil 2014 automatically. For that to happen France need to win and hope Spain slip up and lose to Georgia, with a four goal swing in their favour. With the reigning world and European champions having not lost throughout their entire qualification campaign, the chance of that happening is minimal to say the least. However, France’s 6-0 friendly (or rather unfriendly) drubbing of Australia on Friday offers them some slight hope, with Deschamps having seen his side score ten goals in their last couple of games. Prior to then, they had gone an incredible five games without scoring a single goal. Projected lineups

France vs. Finland, 2014 World Cup qualifying: Preview and TV schedule

resolution, to help prevent the state spiralling out of control with the risk the power vacuum could encourage militancy. The Central African Republic has descended into chaos since mostly Muslim Seleka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize in March, the latest coup in the poor but mineral-rich country. “There is a political emergency because there is no state,” Hollande said as he addressed reporters in Pretoria alongside South African President Jacob Zuma. “There is also an emergency at a regional level because there is a risk of spillover. We might witness religious conflict,” he said, in comments translated from French. There have already been sectarian clashes in the conflict that has driven more than 400,000 people from their homes, fleeing violence including murder and rape. France has about 400 troops in the capital, Bangui, and sources have told Reuters their numbers could be increased to around 750. However, Paris is reluctant to be left to deal with another African hotspot after it felt allies such as the United States were hesitant to help it halt a rebel advance by al Qaeda-linked insurgents in Mali earlier this year. The Central African Republic is geographically at the centre of what some strategists have called an “arc of insecurity” of Islamist fighters that cuts from Kenya and Somalia in east Africa across to Mauritania in the west. Hollande said there was need for African governments to develop a standby force to deal with conflicts as they arise. The African Union has deployed about 2,500 troops. But its resources are limited, prompting Paris to seek a U.N. Security Council mandate that would turn the operation into a U.N. peacekeeping force ultimately supported by French troops. Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, who visited Bangui on Sunday, said the U.N.

France’s Hollande: Central African Republic troubles could spill over

on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1aFlQMF Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. 7 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs France’s retirement reform: Too little, too late? USATODAY 3:22 p.m. EDT October 14, 2013 French President Francois Hollande French President Hollande managed to changed the pension system by working with unions Still, they plan protests Tuesday And critics says he succeeded by making small changes that won’t achieve what’s necessary SHARE 10 CONNECT 26 TWEET 7 COMMENTEMAILMORE PARIS (AP) President Francois Hollande has managed to do what was once thought impossible: Make changes to France’s cherished and generous retirement system with little resistance from unions. His secret? The changes are so small and put off so far into the future that economists say they aren’t worthy of the name “reform.” Labor unions were calling for protests across France on Tuesday. But the demonstrations are not expected to turn into the massive protests that brought cities to a standstill in 2010, when Hollande’s predecessor, Nicolas Sarkozy, raised the retirement age. Partially that is because Hollande, a Socialist, consulted with union leaders when drawing up the reform. Also, the changes, which the lower house of parliament votes on this week, will fix only a part of what needs changing, analysts say. “It’s the salami strategy,” said Elie Cohen, an economist at Sciences Po university. “We have a big problem, we don’t know how to fix it, so we cut it into pieces, like a nice sausage.” Hollande’s reform would lengthen the number of years people must work to receive a full pension, from 41 years today to 43 years by 2035.