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Tyson has done so well with his life since he left the sport (as long as he does not revert to the misbehavior he exhibited after longtime trainer Cus D’Amato died, then all is good). But this isn’t about Tyson or his response to Butler’s letter in the New York Post claiming the organization never reached out to him directly and is “taking advantage of my name and company for publicity.” This is about USA Boxing. When did USA Boxing become so sanctimonious? So righteous and indignant? Boxing promoters have perpetually gone after amateur boxers in an attempt to get them to skip the Olympic route. For years, promoters have used everything from Muhammad Ali throwing his gold medal into the Ohio River to the image of Roy Jones Jr. standing next to a ref as he lifted the arm of Park Si-Hun in the Seoul Olympics (considered by many as one of the most corrupt moments in Olympic history) as examples of the unimportance of the Olympics in the arc of one’s career. More recently, promoters simply need to run off the names of top boxers who didn’t need an Olympic medal to succeed as a pro — Manny Pacquiao, Miguel Cotto, Juan Manuel Marquez, Adrien Broner, Timothy Bradley — to prove that participating in the Olympics is as useful as an iPhone 3GS. After Athens 2004, USA Boxing had been able to say to every American who has thought about joining them: “Look at Andre Ward’s career, and we’ll show you how Ward benefited from being in the Olympics.” But when a country goes through an entire Olympics as the United States did at London 2012 and returns without a single medal, the sell gets difficult. Tyson is doing nothing different from any other promoter in the game since boxing became a free enterprise for promotion and hype. Boxing promoters from Butch Lewis to Bob Arum have always “poached” boxers they feel can make them money sooner rather than later. It’s their way of building a relationship with a boxer before anyone else has the chance. That’s kinda always been part of the (shady) business side of boxing. For USA Boxing to start bitching now is laughable. It reeks of an organization that is panicking.

Cuban defector hopes to play soccer for U.S. national team but faces big obstacle

(Darryl Dyck / Associated Press / August 24, 2013) Also By Jim Peltz October 5, 2013, 5:35 p.m. Before the Galaxy can win its third consecutive Major League Soccer championship, the team first has to get into the playoffs. With four games left in the regular season, that’s by no means guaranteed. Unable to build any momentum in recent games, the Galaxy finds itself in a logjam in the MLS Western Conference, with eight of its nine teams still in playoff contention. The top five teams in the standings after the regular season make the playoffs, and the only club that’s not in contention is last-place Chivas USA (6-17-8), which the Galaxy plays Sunday at StubHub Center. Entering Saturday’s play, the Galaxy (13-11-6) was tied with the Colorado Rapids for fourth place with 45 points. That was only six points behind the two teams tied for first place, Real Salt Lake and the Seattle Sounders, and four points behind the third-place Portland Timbers. And the San Jose Earthquakes , Vancouver Whitecaps and FC Dallas were five points or less behind the Galaxy and Colorado. With a win worth three points to each club, the standings could change quickly in the next few weeks. As Galaxy midfielder Marcelo Sarvas told the team’s website last week, “We have to get points because we’re very close to [playoff] heaven and yet very close to hell.” This will be the Galaxy’s third and final game of the regular season against Chivas USA whose home venue also is StubHub Center in what’s dubbed the SuperClasico series. The Galaxy is the designated home team for this 2 p.m. game (televised on Time Warner Cable SportsNet and UniMas, and carried on AM radio at 1150 and 1330). After a 3-0 win over San Jose on Aug.

USA Boxing swings at Mike Tyson

In his USA Boxing bio, he said his goals were to win a gold medal at the Olympics, turn pro and win every title possible. “We want to be competitive and we want to increase our overall performance in the Olympic Games,” said USA Boxing executive director Anthony Bartkowski. “This is a new strategy of trying to make sure our Olympic-aged athletes are not poached by promoters. In the past, USA Boxing was passive and just accepted it.” Tyson isn’t the only promoter trying to lure amateurs to the pros. Last month, DiBella Entertainment said it signed highly touted 17-year-old Junior “Sugar Boy” Younan of New York to a contract and said he would make his pro debut in late October or early November, after he turned 18. Boxing promoters have long trolled the amateur ranks looking for talent, especially in recent years as the lure of Olympic gold has faded for many fighters. Winning in the Olympics was once a guaranteed way to make millions, but as U.S. Olympic boxing teams have faded so have the prospects for Olympic fighters. The last American man to win an Olympic gold in boxing was Andre Ward in 2004, and last year’s team in London didn’t even medal. USA Boxing, meanwhile, has undergone a series of shake-ups and its funding has been cut by the U.S. Olympic Committee. The executive director of the USOC said Tuesday that boxing, a sport once dominated by Americans, is still trying to find a way to replicate earlier successes. “Boxing is one of those sports that I think we have a very rich tradition in, but not a lot of current performance,” Scott Blackmun said. “I think the recent reorganization of USA Boxing … is going to be very, very beneficial because it brings some very independent thinkers to the board.